Une Interview de Kim Harrison

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Le site Borders Sci-fi propose une interview de Kim Harrison (la série des Rachel Morgan, dans laquelle l'auteur y dévoile sa dernière publication, son admiration pour Clint Eastwood, et quelques détails sur son nouveau projet :

Citation:
Your latest book set in The Hollows hits on February 22. How does Pale Demon compare to the rest of the series?
Being the latest in a series, Pale Demon carries with it a lot of the ongoing themes and, of course, the characters that we have seen up to now. The most obvious difference between Pale Demon and its predecessors is losing Cincinnati as a backdrop. I’ve been wanting to see how the Turn has impacted the rest of the United States, and a road trip book gave me that as we stopped in St. Louis, the Petrified Forest, Las Vegas, and finally San Francisco. The cities were exciting, but it was the desolate, in-between places that truly captured my attention and leant a lost feel to Rachel’s current dilemma.
I also introduce a new big-bad-ugly since Rachel is learning to live with her old ones. Trent has a few surprises, most of which I didn’t know were coming until I actually sat down and wrote. I will be honest. This is my favorite book in the series to date, for a lot of reasons.

What is it about Eastwood’s Spaghetti Westerns that influenced you to the point to base the book titles on them?
I have been asked that a lot! I love the characters that Clint Eastwood plays in his Spaghetti Westerns. The sparse dialog, the subtle expressions—or lack of them—that tell the story, really appeal to me. I like the idea of a man coming in off the desert, fixing the town’s troubles with his own version of justice. Rachel is no Clint Eastwood, but the same sense of “my justice” holds true, and the ability to get the job done. Six Questions with Kim Harrison
by djackson on Feb.20, 2011, under Babel Clash Special Content, Kim Harrison

Thanks for coming back for day two of our Kim Harrison weekend! Today, we have a fun little Q&A with Kim that touches on everything from Clint Eastwood to advice for aspiring writers! Enjoy!


photo of Kim Harrison by Kate Thornton


Your latest book set in The Hollows hits on February 22. How does Pale Demon compare to the rest of the series?



Being the latest in a series, Pale Demon carries with it a lot of the ongoing themes and, of course, the characters that we have seen up to now. The most obvious difference between Pale Demon and its predecessors is losing Cincinnati as a backdrop. I’ve been wanting to see how the Turn has impacted the rest of the United States, and a road trip book gave me that as we stopped in St. Louis, the Petrified Forest, Las Vegas, and finally San Francisco. The cities were exciting, but it was the desolate, in-between places that truly captured my attention and leant a lost feel to Rachel’s current dilemma.



I also introduce a new big-bad-ugly since Rachel is learning to live with her old ones. Trent has a few surprises, most of which I didn’t know were coming until I actually sat down and wrote. I will be honest. This is my favorite book in the series to date, for a lot of reasons.



What is it about Eastwood’s Spaghetti Westerns that influenced you to the point to base the book titles on them?



I have been asked that a lot! I love the characters that Clint Eastwood plays in his Spaghetti Westerns. The sparse dialog, the subtle expressions—or lack of them—that tell the story, really appeal to me. I like the idea of a man coming in off the desert, fixing the town’s troubles with his own version of justice. Rachel is no Clint Eastwood, but the same sense of “my justice” holds true, and the ability to get the job done.


Speaking of that, what is your favorite Eastwood movie and why?

My favorite is actually Pale Rider, if you can believe it. I love the idea of an avenging angel—that angels are not soft and kind, granting wishes to make us cry at the end of the movie, but brutal, hard, warriors that meet out a justice that we don’t always understand.

I also know you’re working on a graphic novel – how is the writing process different from novel to graphic novel?
Yes! Blood Work is in the final stages, and I will be guesting at Comic-Con San Diego this year to celebrate its mid-July release. I can’t wait. This was my first foray into graphic novels, and I enjoyed the opportunity to stretch my creative muscles and try to see the work from an outside POV with odd angles and more visual clues than before. I wrote the script myself, but if it wasn’t for Betsy Mitchell, my editor at Del Rey, I would have been lost. Graphic novels are very different from a novel in terms of how much you can say. I like sparse writing, and it was that!



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